Pacific islands could be helped by MIT infra-red maps

Vaitupu is a tiny low-lying island of 1,600 inhabitants in the Pacific — part of the island nation of Tuvalu (red dot, left) — and one of the first places studied by a mapping project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to expose invisible risks.

The OpenIR project used infra-red images that could help planners with everything from disaster relief to coping with sea level rise.

Arlene Ducao and Ilias Koen, co-principals of the inspiring DuKode Studio, developed Vaitupu maps (below) from satellite images as part of an project (link to the final paper here) for a class Arlene and I attended run by the brilliant cyberscholar and activist Ethan Zuckerman. Vaitupu covers about 5.6 sq kms.

Arlene says the idea is that the maps “pop” — by using different infra-red filters they suddenly highlight the exact extent of things that are invisible to the naked eye, including hard surfaces (pink in the left-hand image) like roads or buildings that floods will run off.

 

 

Or they can highlight vegetation (red, right):

 

 

Or water (blue, left)

 

 

Knowing such factors can help emergency workers help plan relief efforts for a tsunami, a cyclone or an earthquake. They could also set benchmarks against which we can judge sea level rise and other impacts of climate change. My recommendation: get OpenIR!

 

One thought on “Pacific islands could be helped by MIT infra-red maps

  1. Hello and thank you for this article. So-called environmentally induced migration is multi-level problem. According to Essam El-Hinnawi definition form 1985 environmental refugees as those people who have been forced to leave their traditional habitat, temporarily or permanently, because of a marked environmental disruption (natural or triggered by people) that jeopardised their existence and/or seriously affected the quality of their life. The fundamental distinction between `environmental migrants` and `environmental refugees` is a standpoint of contemporsry studies in EDPs.

    According to Bogumil Terminski it seems reasonable to distinguish the general category of environmental migrants from the more specific (subordinate to it) category of environmental refugees.

    Environmental migrants, therefore, are persons making a short-lived, cyclical, or longerterm change of residence, of a voluntary or forced character, due to specific environmental factors. Environmental refugees form a specific type of environmental migrant.

    Environmental refugees, therefore, are persons compelled to spontaneous, short-lived, cyclical, or longer-term changes of residence due to sudden or gradually worsening changes in environmental factors important to their living, which may be of either a short-term or an irreversible character.

    According to Norman Myers environmental refugees are “people who can no longer gain a secure livelihood in their homelands because of drought, soil erosion, desertification, deforestation and other environmental problems, together with associated problems of population pressures and profound poverty”.

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